24 Best Things to Do in New Territories

What is New Territories Most Famous For?

    The list of best things to do in the New Territories is long, including a restored 18th-century walled village, Che Kung Miu Temple, the Monastery of 10,000 Buddhas and the Hong Kong Heritage Museum to name just a few. Although New Territories in Hong Kong is less visited by tourists, it has many unique attractions in store for those who get out of the downtown area – especially when it comes to the remarkable natural features and cultural relics.

    Hikers will enjoy spending time in New Territories, as the region has more than 20 parks with trails offering various levels of difficulty. The more advanced hikers can try out the famous MacLehose’s Trail, while beginners can start off with short Ping Shan Heritage Trail. 

    What are the best things to do in New Territories?

    1

    Che Kung Temple

    Che Kung Temple (Che Kung Miu) is a Grade II historic building located in Tai Wai. Originally built in the 17th century, the temple is usually busiest during the Che Kung Festivals and on the 2nd day of Chinese New Year, which is Che Kung's birthday.

    Visit the main hall to see a statue of Che Kung, along with 3 fan-shaped wheels of fortune in front of the statue. By turning the fan blade, it’s said that you can turn your fortune around. On the 2 sides of the temple, you’ll find a drum and a giant bronze bell.

    Location: Che Kung Miu Road, Tai Wai, Sha Tin, New Territories, Hong Kong

    Open: Daily from 8am to 6pm

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    2

    Hong Kong Heritage Museum

    The Hong Kong Heritage Museum displays a mixture of art, culture and history through dynamic and interactive exhibition programs. It covers 7,500 sq m of exhibition space, consisting of 5 permanent galleries and 6 thematic galleries. Located next to the Sung Min River, the building features traditional Chinese courtyard designs. Families may enjoy the Children’s Discovery Gallery – kids aged 4 to 10 can enjoy 8 learning zones, play with traditional toys, and join theatre programmes during their visit.

    Location: 1 Man Lam Road, Sha Tin, Hong Kong

    Open: Monday and Wednesday–Friday from 10am to 6pm, Saturday–Sunday from 10am to 7pm (closed on Tuesdays)

    Phone: +852 2180 8188

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    3

    Hong Kong Railway Museum

    The Hong Kong Railway Museum displays passenger carriage models and locomotives from around the world. It dates back to 1913, serving as the Tai Po Market Railway Station before it was refurbished as a museum in 1985. The building features an indigenous Chinese architectural style, a waiting hall and ticket office, as well as many vintage photos of Tai Po Town. Admission to the Hong Kong Railway Museum is free.

    Location: 13 Shung Tak Street, Tai Po Market, Tai Po, Hong Kong

    Open: Wednesday–Monday from 10am to 6pm (closed on Tuesdays)

    Phone: +852 2653 3455

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    photo by LN9267 (CC BY-SA 4.0) modified

    4

    Hong Kong Wetland Park

    Hong Kong Wetland Park is a conservation area spanning over 10,000 sq m of wetlands and a 60-hectare reserve park with re-created habitats for wildlife. This natural park attracts those interested in discovering a greener side of the city-rich island.

    The park also has around 235 bird species, 150 butterfly species, 9 species of amphibians, 23 different types of reptiles, and 11 kinds of mammals. One of Wetland Park’s most famous inhabitants is Pui Pui - a large saltwater crocodile who resides in a 72-sq-m enclosure with her own pool and basking areas.

    Location: Wetland Park Rd, Tin Shui Wai, Hong Kong

    Open: Wednesday–Monday from 10am to 5pm (closed on Tuesdays)

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    photo by Wpcpey (CC BY-SA 4.0) modified

    5

    Lam Tsuen Wishing Trees

    The Lam Tsuen Wishing Trees are covered in joss papers in bright shades like red and pink. Legend says that a man once made a wish to the tree for his son to do better in his studies. His wish was granted, and since then, many people come to the 2 trees and write their wishes on a joss paper. They'll then throw it as high as they can into the tree for their wishes to come true.

    As the Lam Tsuen Wishing Trees have been receiving joss papers for decades, it's now customary to tie papers with wishes to purpose-built wooden racks and imitation trees.

    Location: Fangma Village, Lam Tsuen, Tai Po, New Territories, Hong Kong

    Phone: +852 2638 3678

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    photo by Richard Mortel (CC BY 2.0) modified

    6

    Lion Rock Country Park

    Lion Rock Country Park, located in the New Territories of Hong Kong, is named after a natural formation resembling a lion on a hill ridge. It covers about 5.57 sq km of mostly forestry plantations and scenic lookout points like Lion Rock, Beacon Hill, and Mong Fu Shek.

    The area is home to many native species, such as the black-eared kite and the long-tailed macaque. Lion Rock Country Park offers tree walks for those looking to learn about the park's flora species.

    Location: Chuk Yuen Road, Chuk Un, Hong Kong

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    photo by Chong Fat (CC BY-SA 3.0) modified

    7

    Lung Yeuk Tau Heritage Trail

    The Lung Yeuk Tau Heritage Trail lets you delve back into Chinese history. Visitors should allow at least 1 hour to walk this 2-km-long path as it is replete with historical buildings and structures, some from the 12th century, others from the 16th century. The walk takes in walled villages, ancestral halls, a study hall and a temple. Many belonged to the Tang Clan, the largest clan in the New Territories.

    Location: Fanling, Hong Kong

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    photo by User:Matthias Süßen (CC BY-SA 3.0) modified

    8

    Ma On Shan Country Park

    Some of Hong Kong's most dramatic landscapes lie within Ma On Shan Country Park, located on the Sai Kung Peninsula. This 2,880-hectare park is close to the Sai Kung Country Park and Lion Rock Country Park in the New Territories of Hong Kong.

    Ma On Shan Country Park is where many hikers attempt the popular – but difficult – Ma On Shan Country Trail, which takes about 3 hours to complete. If you're not planning to get active, there are plenty of barbecue areas.

    Location: Ma On Shan Country Park, Ma On Shan, Hong Kong

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    photo by Katie Chan (CC BY-SA 3.0) modified

    9

    Man Mo Temple (New Territories)

    Man Mo Temple in the New Territories dates back to 1891. It's built as a place of devotion for Man, the god of literature, and Mo – the god of war. There are other temples under this name throughout China and one on Hong Kong Island.

    Huge incense coils hang from the temple's ceiling and burn for up to 3 consecutive weeks, leaving a heady scent and an exotic atmosphere. Devotees often burn paper houses, servants, cars and other luxuries for deceased relatives (in the belief that the items can be used in the afterlife).

    Location: Fu Sin Street, Tai Wo, Tai Po, New Territories, Hong Kong

    Open: Daily from 8am to 6pm

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    photo by Richard Mortel (CC BY 2.0) modified

    10

    Noah’s Ark Hong Kong Theme Park

    Noah’s Ark Hong Kong is an educational children’s activity with a genuine ark just like in the bible – and it’s huge! They claim this is the world’s first ‘full scale’ replica, although we’re not sure how to substantiate that claim. The Christian-themed kid’s park is best suited to young children, although there is enough to occupy toddlers up age 10. It is kitsch in places but it does a good job of promoting sustainability, care for the environment and our fellow humans.

    Location: 33 Pak Yan Road, Ma Wan Island, New Territories

    Open: Daily from 10am to 6pm (some exhibitions close earlier)

    Phone: +852 3411 8888

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    photo by WiNG (CC BY-SA 3.0) modified

    11

    Sam Tung Uk Museum

    Sam Tung Uk Museum preserves a rural walled village of the same name, which dates back to the 18th century. The Hakka village once housed as many as 300 Chan family members during that period. The living museum features an ancestral hall, a lecture hall, and 2 rows of traditional homes complete with period furniture, handicrafts, and farming tools. There’s also a modern gallery with interactive displays and videos about the rural lifestyle, food, and traditional crafts of Hakka people in Hong Kong.

    Location: 2 Kwu Uk Lane, Tsuen Wan, New Territories, Hong Kong

    Open: Wednesday–Monday from 10am to 6pm (closed on Tuesdays)

    Phone: +852 2411 2001

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    photo by Mk2010 (CC BY-SA 3.0) modified

    12

    Sha Tin Racecourse

    Sha Tin Racecourse dates back to 1978 and is the second racecourse built in Hong Kong after the Happy Valley Racecourse. The track is circled by Penfold Park, while the Hong Kong Sports Institute is within a 5-minute walk away. If you're not planning to bet on a horse, Sha Tin Racecourse has a Fun Zone, which displays interesting facts about the world of horse racing.

    Location: The Hong Kong Jockey Club Sha Tin Racecourse Stand, Sha Tin, Hong Kong

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    photo by WiNG (CC BY-SA 3.0) modified

    13

    Tai Fu Tai Mansion

    Tai Fu Tai Mansion is a beautiful traditional Chinese mansion dating back to 1865. Built by the Man clan, it's the only remaining Mandarin house in Hong Kong. You'll find a main hall, study room, bedrooms, kitchen, and a courtyard, as well as a mausoleum built to honour the Man’s ancestors. The charming mansion is decorated with colourful ceramic figurines, fine plaster mouldings, woodcarvings, and murals.

    Location: Wing Ping Tsuen, San Tin, Yuen Long, Hong Kong

    Open: Monday, Wednesday–Sunday from 9am to 1pm and from 2pm to 5pm (closed on Tuesdays)

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    photo by Pedist (CC BY-SA 3.0) modified

    14

    Tai Mo Shan Country Park

    Tai Mo Shan Country Park is home to Tai Mo Shan, Hong Kong's highest mountain. Locally known as Big Hat or Big Mist Mountain, it stands at 957 metres above sea level, with several hiking trails leading to the summit.

    There's a rotary park near the entrance of Tai Mo Shan Country Park, where you'll find cherry blossom trees. Visit in spring to see these cherry blossoms in full bloom, similar to what you'll experience in Japan or Taiwan.

    Location: Tai Mo Shan Country Park, Tai Mo Shan, Hong Kong

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    photo by C J B Scholten (CC BY-SA 3.0) modified

    15

    Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery

    The Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery is a fascinating temple located in the New Territories. The 20th-century shrine is home to a sprawling collection of Buddha images spread out over 8 hectares of land. It was built by a devout Buddhist monk called the Reverend Yuet Kai in 1957, with the help of his followers. You'll find around 13,000 Buddha images on display, with various poses, styles, materials and sizes. Unlike most temples in Hong Kong, there are no practising monks at The Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery – it's actually run by volunteers.

    Location: Pai Tau, New Territories, Hong Kong

    Open: Daily from 10am to 5pm

    Phone: +852 2691 1067

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    photo by CPJoseph (CC BY-SA 3.0) modified

    16

    Tsang Tai Uk (aka Shan Ha Wai)

    Tsang Tai Uk is a small, walled village built in the 1840s by the Tsang Clan, who were stonemasons. Nowadays there are still many members of the original Tsang families living here.

    Its design is in the northeastern Chinese style and it's one of the best-preserved Hakka walled villages in Hong Kong, with thick, high walls, central and inner courtyards and ancestral halls. Most of the village is private with no access to the public, though the first courtyard and ancestral hall opposite the middle gateway are open for visitors.

    Location: Sha Tin, Hong Kong

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    photo by CPJoseph (CC BY-SA 3.0) modified

    17

    Tsing Yi Island

    Tsing Yi is an urban island northwest of Hong Kong Island. Named after a type of fish that once was abundant in the surrounding waters, it has plenty of green hills, houses on stilts – lending it a resemblance to Tai O – and a pleasant nature trail.

    Tsing Yi Island offers views of Rambler Channel, which separates the island from the Kowloon peninsula. The island is connected to the mainland by several bridges as well as the Airport Express and the Tung Chung MTR line. 

    Location: Tsing Yi, Central New Territories, Hong Kong

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    photo by WiNG (CC BY 3.0) modified

    18

    Tai Po Waterfront Park

    Tai Po Waterfront Park covers an area of 22 hectares in the New Territories, making it one of Hong Kong's largest parks. Onsite facilities include a 32.4-metre spiral staircase lookout tower with telescopes for you to check out the surrounding high-rises.  

    The park also has a 1.2-km-long promenade, gardens, sitting areas, and a 600-seat amphitheatre. You can also enjoy some outdoor activities at Tai Po Waterfront Park – there's a cycling track along Tolo Harbour, along with a jogging trail dotted with exercise stations. 

    Location: Dai Hei Street, Tai Po, New Territories, Hong Kong

    Open: Daily from 8.15am to 11.45pm

    Phone: +852 2664 2107

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    photo by Martin Ng (CC BY-SA 2.0) modified

    19

    Hong Kong Golf Club Fanling

    Hong Kong Golf Club Fanling has 3 golf courses that are open to the public on weekdays. There's also a golf shop selling clothes, equipment and accessories. Green fees (including driving range) cost around HK$1,900 but you can enjoy lower rates if you visit after 3pm. The Hong Kong Golf Club also offers evening practice sessions from 6pm to 10pm, and you can enjoy unlimited use of range balls.

    Location: 1 Fan Kam Road, New Territories, Hong Kong

    Open: Monday–Friday from 7.25am to late

    Phone: +852 2670 7211

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    photo by Wpcpey (CC BY-SA 3.0) modified

    20

    Whitehead Club Golf Driving Range

    The Whitehead Club Golf Driving Range spans 20,000 sq m, making it one of the largest golf driving ranges in Asia. Located in Ma On Shan, it features mirrors in the driving bays and a putting green made of real grass – a rarity in Hong Kong. Rates (including unlimited use of golf balls) cost HK$60 per hour on weekdays and HK$120 on weekends.

    Location: 6 Kam Ying Rd, Ma On Shan, Hong Kong

    Open: Daily from 8am to 10pm

    Phone: +852 2777 1813

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    photo by Chong Fat (CC BY-SA 3.0) modified

    21

    Amah Rock

    Amah Rock is a 15-metre-tall formation within the Lion Rock Country Park. It looks very similar to a woman ('Amah') carrying a baby on her back. Legend says that this woman was the faithful wife of a fisherman who climbed the hill every day, carrying her son, to watch for the return of her husband, not knowing he had been drowned at sea.

    In reward for her faithfulness, she was turned into a rock by the Goddess of the Sea so that her spirit could unite with that of her husband. Amah Rock is another good spot to enjoy a bird's eye view of Sha Tin Town and the New Territories.

    Location: Lion Rock Country Park, Sha Tin, Hong Kong

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    photo by WiNG (CC BY 3.0) modified

    22

    MacLehose Trail

    The MacLehose Trail is one of Hong Kong's most challenging hikes. Named after Sir Murray MacLehose, a former Hong Kong governor, the 100-km-long trail breaks up into 10 stages and runs through 8 parks within the eastern peninsula of Sai Kung. It takes more than 30 hours of hiking to complete the entire trail, attracting experienced hikers with its sea caves, unique rock columns, and beach vistas. 

    Location: Sai Kung, New Territories, Hong Kong

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    photo by C J B Scholten (CC BY-SA 3.0) modified

    23

    Ping Shan Heritage Trail

    The Ping Shan Heritage Trail lets you explore ancient structures, many of which were built by the Tang Clan who settled in New Territories in the 12th century. Must-sees include the 13th-century Tang Ancestral Hall, Tsui Shing Lau Pagoda, a small community weekend market, the 16th-century Yu Kiu Ancestral Hall, and Ping Shan Tang Clan Gallery (housing local folk customs and history).

    Location: Ping Shan, Yuen Long, New Territories, Hong Kong

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    photo by Prince Roy (CC BY 2.0) modified

    24

    Tolo Harbour

    Tolo Harbour is surrounded by low hills and is home to several old and new fishing villages, as well as Tap Mun Chau (aka Grass Island), a former pirate lair. A day out here often leads to outdoor activities like hiking, swimming, and having picnics with views of the ocean.

    Location: New Territories, Hong Kong

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    photo by See-ming Lee (CC BY 2.0) modified

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